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Facebook takes on Twitch with its own live gameplay streaming

GamesIndustry.biz news - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 11:00am
Social network has expanded its Facebook Live functionality to PC software
Categories: Gaming News

Nintendo denies design issue with Switch controllers

GamesIndustry.biz news - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 10:56am
Disconnecting Joy-Cons the result of a "manufacturing variation" which has been corrected for future shipments, company says
Categories: Gaming News

For Honor dev: 'We never intended for players to unlock everything'

Gamasutra - News - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 10:56am

"[Unlocking everything] doesn't really make any sense." Game director Damien Kieken explained how the design philosophy behind For Honor led to its library of hard-to-get unlockables. ...

Categories: Gaming News

'Extreme and Unusual' Climate Trends Continue After Record 2016

Slashdot Updates - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 10:40am
From a report on BBC: In the atmosphere, the seas and around the poles, climate change is reaching disturbing new levels across the Earth. That's according to a detailed global analysis from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). It says that 2016 was not only the warmest year on record, but it saw atmospheric CO2 rise to a new high, while Arctic sea ice recorded a new winter low. The "extreme and unusual" conditions have continued in 2017, it says. Reports earlier this year from major scientific bodies - including the UK's Met Office, Nasa and NOAA -- indicated that 2016 was the warmest year on record. The WMO's State of the Global Climate 2016 report builds on this research with information from 80 national weather services to provide a deeper and more complete picture of the year's climate data.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

Can data save rhinos? How to attack wildlife crime at source

New Scientist - Breaking news - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 10:00am
By the time surveillance technology catches a poacher, it's already too late. Now researchers are training a new generation of technology on the demand for endangered animals, not the supply
Categories: Science & Tech News

A little less ET, a little more astrophysics, if you please

New Scientist - Breaking news - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 10:00am
The role of science is to rule out the boring and tedious before we embrace the extraordinary, like alien signals or "megastructures", says Geraint Lewis
Categories: Science & Tech News

Old blood can be made young again and it might fight ageing

New Scientist - Breaking news - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 10:00am
A protein can boost blood stem cells, making them behave like those of younger people. Is it the key to harnessing young blood’s rejuvenating power?
Categories: Science & Tech News

Robots could help children give evidence in child abuse cases

New Scientist - Breaking news - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 10:00am
Even trained police interviewers find it hard to stay neutral when talking to children who have been abused. Could robots help collect better evidence?
Categories: Science & Tech News

Atomic clocks make best measurement yet of relativity of time

New Scientist - Breaking news - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 10:00am
Einstein's relativity has survived another test, carried out using a network of synchronised atomic clocks in three European cities
Categories: Science & Tech News

First dinosaurs may have been omnivores in the north hemisphere

New Scientist - Breaking news - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 10:00am
Largest shake-up of dinosaur family tree in 130 years puts T. rex in a group with herbivores and uproots what we thought we knew about the reptiles
Categories: Science & Tech News

Female fish with bigger brains choose better mates

New Scientist - Breaking news - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 10:00am
Colourful male guppies are healthier and better foragers. But using this information to pick a good mate requires female guppies to use more brainpower
Categories: Science & Tech News

Cord-Cutting Isn't Nearly as Significant as Cable Providers Make It Out To Be

Slashdot Updates - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 10:00am
From a report on CNBC: Despite legacy media's anxieties about cord-cutting, data suggest that the phenomenon isn't nearly as significant as cable providers make it out to be. In its 11th annual "Digital Democracy Survey," Deloitte found that the percentage of American households that subscribe to paid television services has remained relatively stable since 2012, even as adoption of streaming services has accelerated. In its survey of 2,131 consumers, Deloitte said two-thirds of respondents reported they have kept their TV subscriptions because they're bundled with their internet plan. Kevin Westcott, vice chairman and U.S. media and entertainment leader at Deloitte, told CNBC that bundling seems to be a huge deterrent for cord cutting.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

Blog: What I learned as an indie exhibitor at PAX East

Gamasutra - News - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 9:43am

When preparing for PAX East I saw a similar article from another indie dev and found it quite useful. So, I thought I'd share my own experiences as a first time exhibitor. ...

Categories: Gaming News

Google Contemplating Removing Chrome 'Close Other Tabs' and 'Close Tabs to the Right' Options

Slashdot Updates - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 9:20am
An anonymous reader shares a report: Chrome engineers are planning to remove two options from Chrome that allow users to quickly close a large number of tabs with just a few clicks. The options, named "Close other tabs" and "Close tabs to the right" reside in the menu that appears when a user right-clicks on a Chrome tab. According to an issue on the Chromium project spotted yesterday by a Reddit user, Google engineers planned to remove to menu options for many years even before opening the Chromium issue, dated itself to July 31, 2015. After several years of inactivity and no decision, things started to move again in September 2016, when usage statistics confirmed that Chrome users rarely used the two options they initially wanted to remove. Seeing no new discussions past this point, Chromium engineers assigned the issue in February, meaning engineers are getting ready to remove the two menu options it in future Chromium builds.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

Facebook set to challenge Twitch by adding PC livestreaming tools

Gamasutra - News - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 9:01am

Facebook is expanding its "Facebook Live" livestreaming platform to allow folks to stream from their PCs, making it much easier to stream game development and gameplay on the service. ...

Categories: Gaming News

Firefox for Linux is Now Netflix Compatible

Slashdot Updates - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 8:40am
Brian Fagioli, writing for BetaNews: For a while, Netflix was not available for traditional Linux-based operating systems, meaning users were unable to enjoy the popular streaming service without booting into Windows. This was due to the company's reliance on Microsoft Silverlight. Since then, Netflix adopted HTML5, and it made Google Chrome and Chromium for Linux capable of playing the videos. Unfortunately, Firefox -- the open source browser choice for many Linux users -- was not compatible. Today this changes, however, as Mozilla's offering is now compatible with Netflix!

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

Blog: How Crescent Loom's Kickstarter made it without going viral

Gamasutra - News - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 8:05am

How I got funding to make a game about my neuroscience research. Real-world connections ended up mattering a lot more than "making it" in the larger internet ecosystem, but I still had to use them. ...

Categories: Gaming News

Performance Bugs, 'the Dark Matter of Programming Bugs', Are Out There Lurking and Unseen

Slashdot Updates - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 8:00am
Several Slashdot readers have shared an article by programmer Nicholas Chapman, who talks about a class of bugs that he calls "performance bugs". From the article: A performance bug is when the code computes the correct result, but runs slower than it should due to a programming mistake. The nefarious thing about performance bugs is that the user may never know they are there -- the program appears to work correctly, carrying out the correct operations, showing the right thing on the screen or printing the right text. It just does it a bit more slowly than it should have. It takes an experienced programmer, with a reasonably accurate mental model of the problem and the correct solution, to know how fast the operation should have been performed, and hence if the program is running slower than it should be. I started documenting a few of the performance bugs I came across a few months ago, for example (on some platforms) the insert method of std::map is roughly 7 times slower than it should be, std::map::count() is about twice as slow as it should be, std::map::find() is 15% slower than it should be, aligned malloc is a lot slower than it should be in VS2015.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

Tencent grows online game business, makes gains in mobile

Gamasutra - News - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 7:54am

Chinese internet giant Tencent has grown its online games business and cemented its position as the top earning mobile games publisher on the planet. ...

Categories: Gaming News

Bloodstained drops Wii U version for Switch

GamesIndustry.biz news - Wed, 03/22/2017 - 7:47am
Refunds offered for some backers of Koji Igarashi's Kickstarted Metroidvania game
Categories: Gaming News
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