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Has the social media political bubble theory just been popped?

New Scientist - Breaking news - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 9:57am
If life online drives increasingly partisan attitudes, how come offline older generations are getting polarised quicker than the young, wonders Lara Williams
Categories: Science & Tech News

Nordic Game Awards lists Battlefield 1 and Clash Royale among Game of the Year noms

Gamasutra - News - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 9:40am

Nominees for the 2017 Nordic Game Awards have been announced, with Inside, Owlboy, Hitman, and several other Nordic-developed titles up for awards in multiple categories. ...

Categories: Gaming News

Join us for the big finale of our Deus Ex stream today at 3 PM ET

Gamasutra - News - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 9:25am

This is the end! Tune into the Gamasutra Twitch channel today at 12 PM PT (3 PM ET) as we wrap up our playthrough of the original Deus Ex. ...

Categories: Gaming News

President Trump Misses 90-Day Deadline To Appoint a Cybersecurity Team After Alleged Russian Hacking

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 9:23am
From a report: President-elect Donald Trump was very clear: "I will appoint a team to give me a plan within 90 days of taking office," he said in January, after getting a U.S. intelligence assessment of Russian interference in last year's elections and promising to address cybersecurity. Thursday, Trump hits his 90-day mark. There is no team, there is no plan, and there is no clear answer from the White House on who would even be working on what. It's the latest deadline Trump's set and missed -- from the press conference he said his wife would hold last fall to answer questions about her original immigration process to the plan to defeat ISIS that he'd said would come within his first 30 days in office. Since his inauguration, Trump's issued a few tweets and promises to get to the bottom of Russian hacking -- and accusations of surveillance of Americans, himself included, by the Obama administration.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

Machine learning shows exactly when to zap brain to boost memory

New Scientist - Breaking news - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 9:00am
Jolting the brain with electricity really does seem to boost memory, but only if it’s done at the right time. Now we can detect when the brain could use a shock
Categories: Science & Tech News

Environment chief says US should exit Paris climate agreement

New Scientist - Breaking news - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 8:42am
The US appears to be getting closer to quitting the Paris climate agreement, with Scott Pruitt, the head of the EPA, saying it’s a bad deal for the country
Categories: Science & Tech News

Discovery May Help Decipher Ancient Inca String Code

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 8:40am
A discovery made in a remote mountain village high in the Peruvian Andes suggests that the ancient Inca used accounting devices made of knotted, colored strings for more than accounting. From a report on National Geographic: The devices, called khipus (pronounced kee-poos), used combinations of knots to represent numbers and were used to inventory stores of corn, beans, and other provisions. Spanish accounts from colonial times claim that Inca khipus also encoded history, biographies, and letters, but researchers have yet to decipher any non-numerical meaning in the cords and knots. Now a pair of khipus protected by Andean elders since colonial times may offer fresh clues for understanding how more elaborate versions of the devices could have stored and relayed information. "What we found is a series of complex color combinations between the cords," says Sabine Hyland, professor of anthropology at University of St Andrews in Scotland and a National Geographic Explorer. "The cords have 14 different colors that allow for 95 unique cord patterns. That number is within the range of symbols in logosyllabic writing systems." Hyland theorizes that specific combinations of colored strings and knots may have represented syllables or words.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

G2A: "We're not a grey marketplace, people just don't understand our business"

GamesIndustry.biz news - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 8:17am
It is the video games industry vs G2A at Reboot Develop
Categories: Gaming News

Wikipedia's 'Ban' of 'The Daily Mail' Didn't Really Happen

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 8:00am
Earlier this year, The Guardian reported that editors at Wikipedia had "voted to ban the Daily Mail as a source for the website," calling the publication "generally unreliable." Two months later, not only previous Daily Mail citations on Wikipedia pages are still alive, several new ones have also appeared since. So what's going on? The Outline has the story: There are no rules on Wikipedia, just guidelines. Of Wikipedia's five "pillars," the fifth is that there are no firm rules. There is no formal hierarchy either, though the most dedicated volunteers can apply to become administrators with extra powers after being approved by existing admins. But even they don't say what goes on the site. If there's a dispute or a debate, editors post a "request for comment," asking whoever is interested to have their say. The various points are tallied up by an editor and co-signed by four more after a month, but it's not a vote as in a democracy. Instead, the aim is to reach consensus of opinion, and if that's not possible, to weigh the arguments and pick the side that's most compelling. There was no vote to ban the Daily Mail because Wikipedia editors don't vote. (emphasis ours.) So what happened? The article adds: In this case, an editor submitted a broader request for comment about its [the Daily Mail's] general reliability. Seventy-seven editors participated in the discussion and two thirds supported prohibiting the Daily Mail as a source, with one editor and four co-signing editors (more than usual) chosen among administrators declaring that a consensus, though further discussion continued on a separate noticeboard, alongside complaints that the debate should have been better advertised. Though it's discouraged, the Daily Mail can be (and still is) cited. An editor I met at a recent London "Wikimeet" said he'd used the Daily Mail as a source in the last week, as it was the only source available for the subject he was writing about.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

DomiNations' lifetime revenue passes $100m

GamesIndustry.biz news - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 7:40am
Historical mobile strategy game celebrates two-year anniversary with 32m players
Categories: Gaming News

Designing Conan Exiles' beautiful barbaric gameplay

Gamasutra - News - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 7:34am

"People can be a murderer by night in these games. They can run around killing everyone they see on sight, and in real life they're the sweetest people in the world. You know, for them it's just fun." ...

Categories: Gaming News

The Biggest Time Suck at the Office Might Be Your Computer

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 7:20am
Sharing personal anecdotes and recent studies, a new report on Bloomberg blames outdated computers, decade-old operating systems and ageing equipments for being one of the biggest hurdles that prevents people from doing actual work in their offices. From the article: Slow, outdated computers and intermittent internet connections demoralize workers, a survey of 6,000 European workers said. Half of U.K. employees said creaking computers were "restrictive and limiting," and 38 percent said modern technology would make them more motivated, according to the survey, commissioned by electronics company Sharp. Scott's (a 25-year-old researcher who works at an insurance firm) PC runs the relatively up-to-date Windows 8 operating system, but his computer sometimes struggles to handle large spreadsheets and multiple documents open simultaneously, slowing him down. Others are in a worse spot. One in every eight business laptops and desktops worldwide still run Windows XP, which was introduced in 2001. [...] Some businesses can't help using old hardware or operating systems, because they use specialized software that also hasn't been brought up-to-date.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

Blog: Breaking down the physical design of a C++ project

Gamasutra - News - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 7:17am

An analysis of some of the physical design rules we use for C/C++ code at Our Machinery. ...

Categories: Gaming News

"Why am I even making games?"

GamesIndustry.biz news - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 7:10am
Flavourworks founder and Molyneux protegé Jack Attridge discusses the challenge of starting his own studio, and why he feels games design is stagnant
Categories: Gaming News

MIT No Longer Owns 18.0.0.0/8

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 7:00am
An anonymous reader shares: MIT no longer owns 18.0.0.0/8. That's a very big block of scarce IPv4 addresses that have become available again. One block inside this /8, more specifically 18.145.0.0/16, was transferred to Amazon.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

Microsoft To Shut Down Wunderlist, an App It Acquired Two Years Ago, In Favor Of Homegrown App To-Do

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 6:40am
From a report on TechCrunch: Microsoft acquired the popular mobile to do list application Wunderlist back in 2015, and now it's preparing users for its eventual demise with the release of its new application "To-Do," it announced this week. The new app was built by the team behind Wunderlist, and will bring in the favorite elements of that app in the months ahead, Microsoft insists. The company also added that it won't shut down Wunderlist until it's confident that it has "incorporated the best of Wunderlist into To-Do." In case you're hoping Wunderlist will get some sort of reprieve, Microsoft makes its forthcoming demise pretty clear. Stating its plans in black-and-white: "we will retire Wunderlist," it says in a blog post. In the meantime, Microsoft is encouraging Wunderlist users to make the switch by offering an importer that will bring in your lists and to-dos from Wunderlist into To-Do, where those items will now be available in other Microsoft products, like Exchange and Outlook.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

Facebook banks on virtual reality as the future of socialising

New Scientist - Breaking news - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 6:26am
New tools from Facebook suggest that in the future we will talk to our friends in a virtual reality chat room and enhance our communications with AR
Categories: Science & Tech News

Curve Digital hires new business development manager

GamesIndustry.biz news - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 6:01am
Former Gamer Network trade events manager Charlotte Nangle joins UK publisher
Categories: Gaming News

Physicists Observe 'Negative Mass'

Slashdot Updates - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 6:00am
Physicists have created a fluid with "negative mass," which accelerates towards you when pushed. From a report on BBC: In the everyday world, when an object is pushed, it accelerates in the same direction as the force applied to it; this relationship is described by Isaac Newton's Second Law of Motion. But in theory, matter can have negative mass in the same sense that an electric charge can be positive or negative. Prof Peter Engels, from Washington State University (WSU), and colleagues cooled rubidium atoms to just above the temperature of absolute zero (close to -273C), creating what's known as a Bose-Einstein condensate. In this state, particles move extremely slowly, and following behaviour predicted by quantum mechanics, acting like waves. They also synchronise and move together in what's known as a superfluid, which flows without losing energy.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.

Categories: Science & Tech News

Creative people physically see and process the world differently

New Scientist - Breaking news - Thu, 04/20/2017 - 6:00am
Those who display a high degree of the openness personality trait may be more creative because of the way they process visual information
Categories: Science & Tech News
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